Pointwise   The Connector newsletter Pointwise Facebook Pointwise GitHub Pointwise LinkedIn Another Fine Mesh blog Pointwise Twitter Pointwise YouTube Y+ Calculator
 
   
   
 

Support

Download

Training

Library

Merging Duplicate and Intersecting Connectors

There are two scenarios where a T-Junction occurs in connectors: when the connectors are perpendicular to each other at 90 degrees, or when the connectors are parallel and 0 degrees from each other. The figures below show exaples of these two scenarios in which Δs is generally very small or equal to zero (the connectors lie on top of each other).

Parallel connectors to be merged Intersecting connectors to be merged

For both cases, you would want to split the larger connector of the T-Junction and have the intersecting connector and split connectors share the same common node. The following sections explain how to properly take care of these intersecting connectors in your geometry.

0 Degrees

Three NURBS surfaces on which connectors will need merging

This case often occurs when connectors or domains are automatically created on several database surfaces whose edges do not line up. Begin with several database surfaces on which you wish to put connectors or domains, or skip to the next section if your database already has connectors or domains. Refer to the example and apply the steps to your own grid.

  1. Click on Unstructured on the toolbar.
  2. Defaults
  3. Make sure the Connector frame is checked.
  4. Toggle on Average Δs.
  5. 1.0
  6. Select all database surfaces.
  7. Click on Domains on Database Entities on the toolbar.

Connectors have now been created for each edge of all the database surfaces and domains created on top of them. Because Database Surface 1 and Database Surface 2 are adjacent to each other and have a similar edge, the two connectors in between were merged based on the connector join tolerance set in File, Properties. However, the division between these two database surfaces and Database Surface 3 does not match for the connectors to be joined, so three separate connectors were created. Shown to the right are schematics of the connectors only; the database surfaces and domains were turned off in the View menu for easier viewing.

Connector 3 is overlapping Connectors 1 and 2

If there were no domains to contend with, Connector 3 could simply be deleted and domains created from the remaining connectors. But in our case, the larger domain that uses Connector 3 would end up being deleted and would then have to be recreated manually. So often times, the easiest way to remedy this situation is to utilize the Grid, Merge menu.

  1. Grid, Merge
  2. Check Merge Pairs of Entities.
  3. In the Merge Pairs of Entities frame, enter a Tolerance of 0.01.
  4. In the Type of Entity Pair frame, toggle on Node-Connector.
  5. Select the Node-Connector pair shown to the right.
  6. Apply (The Node-Connector pair has been merged.)
  7. Select any other Node-Connector pairs in your geometry to be merged and click on Apply.

Pairs of connectors to be merged Node-connector pairs that can be merged

Once the connector and adjacent node have been merged, you will notice that now there are four connectors where there were three before; the merging of the middle node and Connector 3 caused the connector to be split into two connectors that resemble Connectors 1 and 2. We will continue using the Grid, Merge menu to fix this without accidentally deleting domains.

  1. In the Type of Entity Pair frame, toggle on Connector-Connector.
  2. Select one of the Connector-Connector pairs.
  3. Apply
  4. OK

90 Degrees

Often this case occurs during hand-made connector creation. Begin with a geometry in which the node of a connector either lies on or close to an adjacent connector. Refer to the example and apply the steps to your own grid.

Example of intersecting connectors at 90 degrees
  1. Grid, Merge
  2. Check Merge Pairs of Entities.
  3. In the Merge Pairs of Entities frame, enter a Tolerance of 0.01.
  4. In the Type of Entity Pair frame, toggle on Node-Connector.
  5. Select the Node-Connector pair shown below.
  6. Apply (The Node-Connector pair has been merged.)
  7. Select any other Node-Connector pairs in your geometry to be merged and click on Apply.

Example of a Node-Connector pair that can be merged

In this example, there were no duplicate connectors created that would call for merging Connector-Connector pairs of entities. However, since duplicate entities can hinder block creation, it is always a good idea to use the Grid, Merge tool to check for duplicate connectors, which can lead to discovering duplicate domains as well.


Back to main D.I.Y. video tutorials page Back to the main DIY training page.

If you have questions about the steps outlined above or on any other meshing topic, please contact us via one of the following methods.

  • Send a question using the Get Help form.
  • Call our support engineers toll free at 800-4PTWISE.
  • Email our support engineers at support@pointwise.com.